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Travel Guide and Information about Sydney

Cycling

If you are a fit and experienced urban cyclist, used to riding on multi-lane roads in heavy traffic, then just get on your bike. Cyclists are permitted just about everywhere on Sydney's roads, except for of some freeway tunnels where bicycle signs will usually direct you to the alternative route. Kerbside lanes are often narrow, so ride assertively, be seen, and take the full lane when you know there is insufficient room to be passed. Bikes are permitted in bus lanes but not bus only lanes (like the harbour bridge, and T-ways).

The city centre is not particularly cyclist friendly traffic-wise. It is not flat either - you can expect regular hills but no marathon uphill climbs. The weather is, however, usually good for cycling.

If you are looking for a quieter ride, a number of quiet on-road and shared pedestrian/cycle paths are available, but can be hard to find. A good place to start is at Sydney Olympic Park where you can get your cycle legs on the extensive off-road trails; then, if you want to, you can follow off-road/quiet road trails out to Parramatta or following the Cooks River to Botany Bay in Southern Sydney. The Harbour Bridge has a dedicated cycle lane, suitable for all ages, but as soon as you get off the bridge you are back onto urban streets in Milsons Point.

The Bourke St cycleway is a north-south route in the City East and a cruisy place to cycle between Woolloomooloo, Darlinghurst and Surry Hills. Lots of shade and cafes to break the trip. Some other separated cycleways have opened in the City centre, but they are yet to form a cohesive network, and your trip may easily end up on a busy and unforgiving city road if you haven't planned well in advance.

Other cycleways are often just converted footpaths, so be on the lookout for bollards, street signs, roots and branches strategically placed across cycle paths - as well as pedestrians. If cycling at night ensure you have lights bright enough to light your path.

It is illegal to ride bicycles on footpaths unless cycling with children under 12. In reality this is fairly weakly enforced out in the suburbs, but it is common for people to be fined for cycling through pedestrian malls in the city like Pitt St Mall or Martin Place. Out in the suburbs you can often follow quiet streets, and hop onto the footpath for a short stretch if things get too hairy. Bicycle helmets are required by law, as are lights and reflectors at night.

Bicycles can be taken on all trains for no cost. But catching a train in the city centre of close to the city in the peak may mean waiting for several services to find one you will fit. Check trackwork schedules on weekends, when buses replace trains and make taking bicycles more challenging.

Sydney centre now has a dockless bike share scheme. Simply download the app, pay a $100 refundable deposit, and you can grab your closest bike and ride it anywhere for $1.99 per 30 minutes. Park it anywhere you like. It's an easy way to cycle over the harbour bridge for just $2. Longer term bike hire is available in many locations in Sydney. Unfortunately, bike hire for two bikes for a day usually costs more than hiring a small car and petrol for the day (around $50 per bike). However, for shorter periods some places may be reasonably priced (for example Sydney Olympic Park) charges $15 per hour. Also, you have to consider the additional cost if the bikes are stolen or damaged. However, they are much easier to park, are greener and can be more fun. See the district articles for bike hire listings.

If you want to join in a longer ride, most bicycle user groups around Sydney organise weekend rides for various levels of fitness. There is usually no charge to join in.

Golf

Golf at Parramatta Golf Course, or Fox Hills Golf Course

Sightseeing

Most of the Sydney landmarks can be seen in the City Centre with the iconic Sydney Opera House as well as visiting the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Tower, St Mary's Cathedral, Royal Botanic Gardens and the State Library of New South Wales. Right next to the centre is the historic district of The Rocks where you see Sydney's heritage as well as walk across the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

Darling Harbour is west of the City Centre and offers plenty of attractions such as the National Maritime Museum, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney Wildlife World, Sydney Aquarium and the Powerhouse Museum.

Cross the Harbour Bridge to reach the Lower North Shore where you can visit Luna Park. Taronga Zoo can be reached by a dedicated ferry from Circular Quay.

Take the ferry further out to Manly where you can visit the famous beach and walk to Middle Head passes many coastal artillery fortifications built into the cliffs of Sydney Harbour during the late nineteenth century.

Head out in the sun to visit the Eastern Suburbs where you can find the world famous Bondi beach, as well as many other beaches and La Perouse.

Sydney offers many opportunities to discover indigenous heritage, with rock carvings, dancing and art galleries to explore.

The Royal Botanic Garden is the most important green space in the Sydney region, hosting both scientific and leisure activities. There are 15 separate parks under the administration of the City of Sydney. Parks within the city centre include Hyde Park, The Domain and Prince Alfred Park.

The outer suburbs include Centennial Park and Moore Park in the east, Sydney Park and Royal National Park in the south, Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park in the north, and Western Sydney Parklands in the west, which is one of the largest urban parks in the world. The Royal National Park was proclaimed on 26 April 1879 and with 13200ha is the second oldest national park in the world. The largest park in the Sydney metropolitan area is Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park, established in 1894 with an area of 15400ha. It is regarded for its well-preserved records of indigenous habitation and more than 800 rock engravings, cave drawings and middens have been located in the park.

The area now known as The Domain was set aside by Governor Arthur Phillip in 1788 as his private reserve. Under the orders of Macquarie the land to the immediate north of The Domain became the Royal Botanic Garden in 1816. This makes them the oldest botanic garden in Australia. The Gardens are not just a place for exploration and relaxation, but also for scientific research with herbarium collections, a library and laboratories. The two parks have a total area of 64ha with 8,900 individual plant species and receive over 3.5 million annual visits.

To the south of The Domain is Hyde Park. It is the oldest public parkland in Australia and measures 16.2ha in area. Its location was used for both relaxation and the grazing of animals from the earliest days of the colony. Macquarie dedicated it in 1810 for the "recreation and amusement of the inhabitants of the town" and named it in honour of the original Hyde Park in London.

Eat and drink

Prices in Sydney's restaurants vary. Breakfast at a standard cafe can cost anywhere up to $20 for a full English breakfast or other substantial meal. A main meal in a mid-range restaurant is around $25 - $35. Upper mid-range averages around $35 - $45. At the real top-end places a dinner for two with wine can run up to $400-500 and beyond.

For the more budget-conscious, Sydney's multicultural demography means plenty of quality ethnic cuisine for cheap eats, particularly Asian restaurants in Chinatown where rock bottom priced food (but no less tasty) can be found. Plonk down at a laminate table shoulder to shoulder with hungry locals for some bubble tea and a sizzling plate of delicious Asian food. Many restaurants in the city will also offer "lunch specials". For example, a good Korean "set lunch" can be found for less than $15. A bowl of noodles in Chinatown will run you $8 or $9. Some Thai curry with rice at any of the many restaurants all over Sydney will cost about $10.

Newtown in Sydney's inner-west (approx 4km from the CBD) is renowned for its inexpensive cafes and restaurants on King St, in particular Thai food. It is highly popular among students from the nearby University of Sydney.

Sydney central business district

The Sydney central business district is the main commercial centre of Sydney, the state capital of New South Wales and the most populous city in Australia. It extends southwards for about 3km from Sydney Cove, the point of first European settlement in which the Sydney region was initially established. Due to its pivotal role in Australia's early history, it is one of the oldest established areas in the country. Geographically, its north–south axis runs from Circular Quay in the north to Central railway station in the south. Its east–west axis runs from a chain of parkland that includes Hyde Park, The Domain, Royal Botanic Gardens and Farm Cove on Sydney Harbour in the east; to Darling Harbour and the Western Distributor in the west. At the 2016 Australian Census, the CBD recorded a population of 17,252. "Sydney CBD" is very occasionally used to refer not only to the CBD proper, but also its nearby inner suburbs such as Pyrmont, Haymarket, Ultimo and Woolloomooloo. The Sydney CBD is Australia's main financial and economic centre, as well as a leading hub of economic activity for the Asia-Pacific region. The city centre employs approximately 13% of the Sydney region's workforce. It produced $64.1 billion worth of goods and services in 2011–12. Culturally, the city centre is Sydney's focal point for nightlife and entertainment. It is also home to some of the city's most significant buildings and structures.

Activities

If you are a fit and experienced urban cyclist, used to riding on multi-lane roads in heavy traffic, then just get on your bike. Cyclists are permitted just about everywhere on Sydney's roads, except for of some freeway tunnels where bicycle signs will usually direct you to the alternative route. Kerbside lanes are often narrow, so ride assertively, be seen, and take the full lane when you know there is insufficient room to be passed. Bikes are permitted in bus lanes but not bus only lanes (like the harbour bridge, and T-ways).

The city centre is not particularly cyclist friendly traffic-wise. It is not flat either - you can expect regular hills but no marathon uphill climbs. The weather is, however, usually good for cycling.

If you are looking for a quieter ride, a number of quiet on-road and shared pedestrian/cycle paths are available, but can be hard to find. A good place to start is at Sydney Olympic Park where you can get your cycle legs on the extensive off-road trails; then, if you want to, you can follow off-road/quiet road trails out to Parramatta or following the Cooks River to Botany Bay in Southern Sydney. The Harbour Bridge has a dedicated cycle lane, suitable for all ages, but as soon as you get off the bridge you are back onto urban streets in Milsons Point.

The Bourke St cycleway is a north-south route in the City East and a cruisy place to cycle between Woolloomooloo, Darlinghurst and Surry Hills. Lots of shade and cafes to break the trip. Some other separated cycleways have opened in the City centre, but they are yet to form a cohesive network, and your trip may easily end up on a busy and unforgiving city road if you haven't planned well in advance.

Other cycleways are often just converted footpaths, so be on the lookout for bollards, street signs, roots and branches strategically placed across cycle paths - as well as pedestrians. If cycling at night ensure you have lights bright enough to light your path.

It is illegal to ride bicycles on footpaths unless cycling with children under 12. In reality this is fairly weakly enforced out in the suburbs, but it is common for people to be fined for cycling through pedestrian malls in the city like Pitt St Mall or Martin Place. Out in the suburbs you can often follow quiet streets, and hop onto the footpath for a short stretch if things get too hairy. Bicycle helmets are required by law, as are lights and reflectors at night.

Bicycles can be taken on all trains for no cost. But catching a train in the city centre of close to the city in the peak may mean waiting for several services to find one you will fit. Check trackwork schedules on weekends, when buses replace trains and make taking bicycles more challenging.

Sydney centre now has a dockless bike share scheme. Simply download the app, pay a $100 refundable deposit, and you can grab your closest bike and ride it anywhere for $1.99 per 30 minutes. Park it anywhere you like. It's an easy way to cycle over the harbour bridge for just $2. Longer term bike hire is available in many locations in Sydney. Unfortunately, bike hire for two bikes for a day usually costs more than hiring a small car and petrol for the day (around $50 per bike). However, for shorter periods some places may be reasonably priced (for example Sydney Olympic Park) charges $15 per hour. Also, you have to consider the additional cost if the bikes are stolen or damaged. However, they are much easier to park, are greener and can be more fun. See the district articles for bike hire listings.

If you want to join in a longer ride, most bicycle user groups around Sydney organise weekend rides for various levels of fitness. There is usually no charge to join in.

See the Sydney District Pages for things to buy in the City, and other Sydney districts.

Most stores will accept VISA/Mastercard credit cards, and only a few take only cash. American Express is generally accepted only at larger stores.

Shiprock Point in Dolans Bay has a marine reserve. Some tropical fish can even be seen here in the summer months, when the water is warm in February mainly. You can see many fish varieties snorkelling along the rocks all the way around from Lilli Pilli Point to Shiprock. Watch out for fishermen outside the reserve, and watch out for speedboats in the channel. Shiprock Dive can hire equipment or do training courses.

Golf at Parramatta Golf Course, or Fox Hills Golf Course

Sydney has a huge amount of green space, much of it beside the sparkling harbour or ocean, so walking is a great way to experience the city's parks, reserves and remnant bushland. There are also great walks through the more built-up areas, allowing you to check out the city's modern architecture and its colonial heritage. The following are just a few of the better-known routes.

  • Circular Quay and surrounds. Start underneath the Sydney Harbour Bridge, then walk with the harbour waters on your left, down through The Rocks, across Circular Quay, up to and around the Sydney Opera House, down through the Royal Botanic Gardens, and up to the magnificent view of the Opera House and the Harbour Bridge at Mrs Macquarie's Chair. Some variation of this spectacular walk is, for many, the epitome of the Sydney experience. For detailed information about a walking tour of the city centre, covering these sights and other major sights, see Walking tour of Sydney.

  • Across the Harbour Bridge from The Rocks on the south side to Milsons Point on the north side (or vice versa).

  • Coogee Beach to Bondi. Following the eastern coastline past several of Sydney's beautiful beaches - stop off for a swim if you get too hot.

  • Manly to the Spit. Along the foreshore of Sydney Harbour.

  • Bradleys Head. Take a ferry to Taronga Zoo wharf and then head to your right along the promontory. There's pristine bushland (almost unchanged from the time of European colonisation), quiet beaches, and knockout views across the harbour, and in the warmer months you'll spot plenty of Eastern Water Dragons, a type of large lizard. Once you reach the tip of the headland, you can either amble back to the wharf or - if you're feeling more ambitious - follow the track several more kilometres to Clifton Gardens, ogling the gigantic houses along the way. From there, you can either hike all the way back to Taronga or get a bus to a ferry wharf.

The southern end of the beach is reserved for surfers. There is one surf school, or you can rent surf boards and body boards, as well as wetsuits. A cheaper option is Sydney Surfboard Rental and Hire.

Nightlife

Sydney has an enormous number of places to drink and party. Thanks to recent changes in legislation, there is now a burgeoning scene for quirky and unique small bars, and the city's cultural life has enjoyed a refreshing growth in night-time choices. There's a litany of clubs and venues for entertainment, and as with most Australian cities, Sydney has a strong live music scene. The majority of pubs and smaller clubs close before 3AM and some as early as 12AM, particularly if there are nearby residents. A limited number of venues have 24-hour licenses.

You cannot enter any venue in the Sydney CBD after 1:30am, and last drinks will be called at 3:00am. However, there are lots of bars outside the lockout zone.

Busy venues will have door staff checking photo identification to determine that you are over 18. Admission is also commonly refused to those who seem visibly drunk. More popular venues have discriminatory door practices, the most common of which is refusing entry to groups of men who are not accompanied by women. Some pubs and most clubs will admit children accompanied by adults as long as they don't approach the bar or enter an area where there is gambling, particularly earlier in the evening. Check with staff at the venue. Some pubs don't provide a nice environment for children some nights.

Many places have at least a basic dress code, enforced all hours in the city, and usually after 7pm in the suburbs. For most generic pubs, men should wear closed toe shoes (not running sneakers), full-length pants, and a shirt with sleeves (not a singlet). For clubs, men should don neat business-style shoes. In almost all cases, women can dress more freely, but a small number of places require closed shoes or dressy sandals or high heels.

Many pubs are called hotels, but only very few can ever offer you a place to sleep. Hotel pubs are usually found on a street corner with at least one ground-floor bar, and are usually a few floors high (though not all floors may be open to the public).

Entry charges for live music or DJs are usual and range from $5 to $30 depending on clientèle. Entry charges are rare if you're going into a pub for a drink.

There is a taxi shift change at 3AM, and it is notoriously difficult to catch a taxi anywhere between 2:30AM and 3:30AM, but Ubers are out in force at this time of night.

Some types of nightlife are concentrated in particular areas:

  • Backpackers drink near the hostels, and will find a lot of fellow budget travellers in pubs in the Eastern Suburbs Beaches like Bondi Beach and Kings Cross in the City East

  • In some ways Irish pubs are a global phenomenon, but they've certainly taken Sydney by storm. Irish pubs are concentrated in both The Rocks area and the southern area of the city. They are outrageously popular on the 17th March for St Patrick's Day.

  • Sydney's large gay scene is concentrated on Oxford Street in City East although it still has a large range of pubs and clubs for all ranges of sexuality and is a prominent nightspot for many party-goers. Sydney's queer community also can often be found on King Street in Newtown which offers a more relaxed place to gather and far fewer yobs.

  • Sydney's bohemians, artists, and students mostly hang about in the Inner West. King Street in Newtown is littered with great joints. Try the Midnight Shift or Corridor for awesome music and a low key vibe. Bloodwood is a must for killer Bloody Marys. The Courthouse is everyones local, either that or the Town Hall Hotel, which is open the latest on the strip. Hook round to Erskineville Rd. for even more choice of unique places. A meal at The Rose on a sunny afternoon is a must. Opposite the Hive Bar will have eccentric DJs spinning rare dub 45's. Surry Hills is also a hot spot, with many of the larger venues that host bigger events. The Oxford Arts Factory and The Standard, both on Oxford St., are two great venues where you'll catch larger touring bands and other acts. Yulli's on Crown St have excellent drinks. The Flinders host local bands and has an American dive bar flavour. Try student bars Manning at Sydney Uni, the Roundhouse at UNSW and the Loft at UTS which all offer pleasant, hassle free environments, and no one checks if you're a student. Manning Bar is also great for a meal as they have their Manning BBQ. The Clare opposite UTS on Broadway, though very ratty looking, is a similarly popular place for students. There are many great bars and pubs on Broadway, such as the Lansdowne Hotel which also offers cheap lunch meals for $5-6 on some days of the week.

  • Nightclubs are mostly found in the Kings Cross area. This is the central party district for late club nights. In addition to this there are clubs in the CBD, Surry Hills (along Oxford St.), and Darling Harbour. Try The Kings Cross Hotel for many levels of local bands and DJs. Nearby the World Bar is a must for more great entertainment. GoodGod Small Bar and Danceteria in the CBD absolutely has the best vibe and music in town.

  • Sydney has a big scene for microbreweries, including The Lord Nelson (The Rocks), The Schwartz Brewery (City), Young Henry's (Newtown) and the Local Taphouse (Surry Hills).

  • Business pubs also cater to the city crowd: lawyers, financiers and brokers and are very busy Friday nights when the city workers are let loose for the week.

There are many great nightclubs in Sydney, unfortunately they are very spread out so it would be a good idea to get an idea of were you want to go. Check guides in Friday's newspapers, or the free guides available in music stores and youth clothing stores.

Shopping

See the Sydney District Pages for things to buy in the City, and other Sydney districts.

Most stores will accept VISA/Mastercard credit cards, and only a few take only cash. American Express is generally accepted only at larger stores.

Relax in a park

The Royal Botanic Garden is the most important green space in the Sydney region, hosting both scientific and leisure activities. There are 15 separate parks under the administration of the City of Sydney. Parks within the city centre include Hyde Park, The Domain and Prince Alfred Park.

The outer suburbs include Centennial Park and Moore Park in the east, Sydney Park and Royal National Park in the south, Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park in the north, and Western Sydney Parklands in the west, which is one of the largest urban parks in the world. The Royal National Park was proclaimed on 26 April 1879 and with 13200ha is the second oldest national park in the world. The largest park in the Sydney metropolitan area is Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park, established in 1894 with an area of 15400ha. It is regarded for its well-preserved records of indigenous habitation and more than 800 rock engravings, cave drawings and middens have been located in the park.

The area now known as The Domain was set aside by Governor Arthur Phillip in 1788 as his private reserve. Under the orders of Macquarie the land to the immediate north of The Domain became the Royal Botanic Garden in 1816. This makes them the oldest botanic garden in Australia. The Gardens are not just a place for exploration and relaxation, but also for scientific research with herbarium collections, a library and laboratories. The two parks have a total area of 64ha with 8,900 individual plant species and receive over 3.5 million annual visits.

To the south of The Domain is Hyde Park. It is the oldest public parkland in Australia and measures 16.2ha in area. Its location was used for both relaxation and the grazing of animals from the earliest days of the colony. Macquarie dedicated it in 1810 for the "recreation and amusement of the inhabitants of the town" and named it in honour of the original Hyde Park in London.

KCON

KCON is an annual Korean wave convention held in different locations across the world, organized by Powerhouse Live, Mnet Media, CJ E&M and Koreaboo. It started in 2012 and is based in Southern California but expanded to the East Coast and Japan in 2015. In 2016, KCON expanded into Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates on March 25, 2016 and in Paris, France on June 2, 2016 for first time. In 2017, KCON announced that they will be hosting their first KCON Mexico at the Mexico City Arena on March 17 and 18, 2017. KCON would be expanding to Australia for the first time, making it the 7th expansion country since KCON launched in 2012.

KCON is produced by Powerhouse Live and organized by the South Korean music label and entertainment agency Mnet America. It was created in 2012 by K-Pop media company, Koreaboo in partnership with Mnet America and CJ E&M. KCON's aim is to establish an annual flagship event that will improve the experiences of American fans by providing them with an affordable way to connect with each other, as well as with artists and professionals from the K-pop music industry. During KCON ‘12, Mnet Media's Ted Kim was interviewed by journalist Michael Holmes from CNN to discuss about the rise of K-Pop in the United States.

On June 21, 2016, Euny Hong reported in the Wall Street Journal that the North American KCONs, although very popular, were only a break-even financially. CJ E&M's American CEO Angela Killoren said they are more interested in a long term goal of raising Korea's brand value than short-term gain. Also, in a June press conference, Shin Hyung-kwan, president of CJ E&M’s Mnet contents business, said, "KCON, which has been held in Abu Dhabi in March, Japan in April, and Paris early this month, is not just about making money. Numbers are important but what matters more is the potentials created by the event for the next five, 10 and 20 years." Shin added that the company goals were increasing the growth of products and services to the global market by expanding partnerships with Korean small and medium enterprises.

Jeff Benjamin, Billboard K-Town columnist, wrote that the convention has "hit every note to provide a new look at a world of music still gaining ground in the U.S", and with thousands of people from all over North America attending KCON ‘12, the convention has "truly proved its ability to pass language barriers and kick-start what may be an annual music tradition." The Orange County Register described KCON ‘12 as "A daylong K-Pop invasion at Verizon Wireless Amphitheater".

In 2014, New York City's Fuse TV said, "In just three years, KCON has become an annual pilgrimage for K-pop fans in America. NBC News said, "Thousands of screaming fans and the stars they adore gathered in Los Angeles for KCON, a celebration of Korean pop music and culture". Miami's Fusion TV called KCON '14 "the mother ship of all Korean culture events in this country", and observed, "k-pop fans might be the most devoted in the entire world." Melissa Block of NPR's All Things Considered said of KCON '14, "K-pop is here to stay."

In 2015, Daniel Kreps of Rolling Stone wrote: "KCON has become so popular in the U.S. that even the Los Angeles fest is expanding to a larger venue...as attendance has ballooned since the inaugural KCON LA in 2012", and "will go bi-coastal...and head to Newark", adding, "KCON also hosted their first ever Japan convention." August Brown of the Los Angeles Times wrote: "In its early years, many wondered whether a South Korean act (other than Psy) could impact mainstream top-40 pop. But after watching the Sunday night installment of KCON 2015, it's clear that's the wrong question. K-pop's young and wide-ranging audience is the new mainstream in America."

CityCountryVenueAttendanceLine-up
October 13, 2012IrvineUnited StatesVerizon Wireless Amphitheatre10,0004Minute, B.A.P, EXO-M, G.NA, NU'EST, VIXX
August 24, 2013Los AngelesLos Angeles Memorial Sports Arena20,0002AM, Dynamic Duo, EXO (K & M)), F(x) (with DJ Koo), G-Dragon, Crayon Pop, Henry Lau, Missy Elliott, Teen Top, Yu Seung Woo (with Heejun Han)
August 25, 2013
August 9, 201442,000G-Dragon, B1A4, IU, Teen Top, VIXX
August 10, 2014Girls' Generation, BTS, CNBLUE, Jung Joon-young, Spica
April 22, 2015SaitamaJapanSaitama Super Arena Outdoor Stage:
5tion, CODE-V, High4, Shu-I, Tahiti
15,000M! Countdown Stage:
Block B, B1A4, Boyfriend, GOT7, Infinite, Jun. K, Kangnam, Lovelyz, My Name, Nicole, Sistar, Supernova
August 1, 2015Los AngelesUnited StatesStaples Center58,000GOT7, MONSTA X, Roy Kim, Sistar, Super Junior
August 2, 2015AOA, Block B, Red Velvet, Shinhwa, Zion.T & Crush
August 8, 2015New JerseyPrudential Center17,000Girls' Generation VIXX, AOA, Teen Top
November 6–7, 2015JejuSouth KoreaJeju Stadium17,000Convention Stage
DAY6, Park Boram, Paloalto, Sonamoo, Mamamoo, Poten, Roy Kim, Oh My Girl Stadium Concert
Block B, Kangnam, Teen Top, SPICA, Roy Kim, Chen Zi Tong, SG Wannabe, Shin Seung-hun, Shinhwa
March 25, 2016Abu DhabiUnited Arab EmiratesYas Island - DU ARENA8,000BTS, Taeyeon, Kyuhyun, Double S 301, Ailee, Monsta X, SPICA
April 9, 2016ChibaJapanMakuhari Messe33,000AOA, Kim Sung-kyu, Lovelyz, MONSTA X, Nicole, N.Flying, WINNER
April 10, 20162PM, Boyfriend, TWICE, Block B, DAY6, Jun Jin, Heize
June 2, 2016ParisFranceAccorHotels Arena18,476BTS, Block B, SHINee, F.T. Island, f(x), I.O.I
June 24, 2016New JerseyUnited StatesPrudential Center40,000Ailee, BtoB, Crush + Dynamic Duo, Seventeen
June 25, 2016BTS, DAY6, Eric Nam, Mamamoo
July 30, 2016Los AngelesStaples Center76,000Block B, DΞΔN, Amber, G-Friend, I.O.I, SHINee, Turbo
July 31, 2016ASTRO, BTS, Davichi, Eric Nam, Girls' Generation-TTS, MONSTA X, TWICE
March 17, 2017Mexico CityMexicoMexico City Arena33,000BTS, Eric Nam, EXID, NCT 127
March 18, 2017ASTRO, Infinite H, MONSTA X, Red Velvet
May 19, 2017ChibaJapanMakuhari Messe48,500Convention Stage
A-JAX, Boys Republic, INX, NAUGHTYBOYS, Noh Ji Hoon, Pungdeng-E, STELLAR, TopSecret, TRITOPS M! Countdown Stage
Apeace, ASTRO, BTOB, DAY6, Junho, PRISTIN, SF9, VICTON
May 20, 2017Convention Stage
A-JAX, Boys Republic, INX, NAUGHTYBOYS, Noh Ji Hoon, Pungdeng-E, STELLAR, TopSecret, TRITOPS, UNIONE M! Countdown Stage
Apink, Babylon, CLC, CNBlue, GOT7, Heize, Lovelyz, MONSTA X
May 21, 2017Convention Stage
A-JAX, INX, NAUGHTYBOYS, Noh Ji Hoon, Pungdeng-E, STELLAR, TopSecret, TRITOPS, UNIONE M! Countdown Stage
Block B, CODE-V, GFriend, K.Will, PENTAGON, Seventeen, Boys24 Unit Black, Cosmic Girls
June 23, 2017New JerseyUnited StatesPrudential Center43,000GFriend, Highlight, KNK, SF9, Zion.T
June 24, 2017CNBLUE, NCT 127, TWICE, UP10TION
August 19, 2017Los AngelesStaples Center85,000Cosmic Girls, Girl's Day, SEVENTEEN, SF9, Super Junior-D&E, VIXX
August 20, 2017ASTRO, GOT7, Heize, KARD, NCT 127, Wanna One, Oh My Girl, Kim Tae-Woo
September 22, 2017SydneyAustraliaQudos Bank Arena21,000EXO, Girl's Day, PENTAGON, SF9, VICTON
September 23, 2017Cosmic Girls, MONSTA X, SF9, UP10TION, Wanna One
April 13, 2018ChibaJapanMakuhari MesseTBATBA
April 14, 2018TBA
April 15, 2018TBA

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