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Travel Guide and Information about San_Juan

Cordon bleu

A cordon bleu or schnitzel cordon bleu is a dish of meat wrapped around cheese then breaded and pan-fried or deep-fried. Veal or pork cordon bleu is made of veal or pork pounded thin and wrapped around a slice of ham and a slice of cheese, breaded, and then pan fried or baked. For chicken cordon bleu chicken breast is used instead of veal. Ham cordon bleu is ham stuffed with mushrooms and cheese.

The French term cordon bleu is translated as "blue ribbon". According to Larousse Gastronomique cordon bleu "was originally a wide blue ribbon worn by members of the highest order of knighthood, L'Ordre des chevaliers du Saint-Esprit, instituted by Henri III of France in 1578. By extension, the term has since been applied to food prepared to a very high standard and to outstanding cooks. The analogy no doubt arose from the similarity between the sash worn by the knights and the ribbons of a cook's apron."

The origins of cordon bleu as a schnitzel filled with cheese are in Switzerland, probably about the 1940s, first mentioned in a cookbook from 1949. The earliest reference to "chicken cordon bleu" in The New York Times is dated to 1967, while similar veal recipes are found from at least 1955.

There are many variations of the recipe, all of which involve a cutlet, cheese, and meat. A popular way to prepare chicken cordon bleu is to butterfly cut a chicken breast, place a thin slice of ham inside, along with a thin slice of a soft, easily melted cheese such as Swiss. The chicken breast is then rolled into a roulade, coated in bread crumbs and then deep fried. Other variations exist with the chicken baked rather than fried.

Other common variations include omitting the bread crumbs, wrapping the ham around the chicken, or using bacon in place of ham.

A variant popular in the Asturias province of Spain is cachopo, a deep-fried cutlet of veal, beef or chicken wrapped around a filling of Serrano ham and cheese. In Spain, the version made with chicken is often called san jacobo.

In largely Muslim-populated countries, the halal versions of chicken cordon bleu are also popular, such that the chicken is rolled around beef or mutton instead of pork product.

Eat and drink

  • Al Dente, Calle Recinto Sur 309, Old San Juan, +1 787-723-7303. M-F 12PM-3PM; M-Sa 6PM-11PM; Sun 12:30PM-4PM and 6PM-10PM. The oldest continuously operated Italian restaurant in Puerto Rico.

  • Café Puerto Rico, Calle O'Donnell 208, +1 787 724-2281. 11:30AM-11PM. Creole cuisine. On the Plaza de Colón, enjoy the view along with a great meal. Great spot to stop for a drink, snack & conversation too. Live music weekends & some weekdays. Best meal: stuffed snapper rice & beans, and sweet plantains. $9-21 main course but order side dishes too.

  • El Alcázar, 1013 Ave. Roosevelt. New Spanish restaurant which serves a variety of tapas, seafood and several meats. Also has a variety of Wines. The ambience is romantic and live music is offered several times a month.

  • La Bombonera, +1 787-722-0658. Calle San Francisco, west of Tanca. 7:30AM-8PM. Authentic local cuisine in an unassuming landmark atmosphere unchanged for decades. Serves lunch and dinner. Fresh pastries. Superlative coffee. Inexpensive.

  • Luigi's Restaurant, 104 Diez de Andino, Condado, +1 787-722-2672. M-Sa 11:30AM-3PM and 6PM-10PM; Su noon-5PM. Serves Italian and Genovese cuisine.
  • Margarita's, Several locations including 3rd level at Plaza las Américas and 1013 Ave. Roosevelt, +1 787-792-0283. A traditional Mexican food restaurants.
  • Milagros y Sean's, Isla Verde. Delicious traditional home cooked Spanish food and half-edible Irish cuisine if you're not in the mood for good tasting things. Bartender makes great cocktails and pours a terrible Guinness. Lounge area with 1990s hip-hop, R&B classics, and semi-tolerable fiddle.
  • Ostra Cosa, Calle del Cristo 154, Old San Juan, +1 787-722-2672. Daily noon-10PM. Reservations recommended. The ambience here is one of the most sensual and romantic in Old San Juan.
  • Pamela's restaurant, +1 787 726-5010, Calle Santa Ana 1. Traditional Caribbean and Puerto Rican dishes are prepared by a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America. You have the choice of eating inside or outside on the beach. Lunch runs around $15 while dinner is a little more ($20-25).
  • Parrot Club, Calle Fortaleza 363, Old San Juan, +1 787-725-7370. Daily noon-3PM; 6PM-11PM. Live music, either Brazilian, salsa, or Latino jazz, is offered nightly and during the popular Sunday brunches.
  • Ramiro's, Av. Magdalena 1106, Condado, +1 787-721-9049. M-Sa noon-3PM & 6PM-11PM; Su noon-3PM & 6PM-10PM. Creole" style cooking pioneered by owner and chef Jesús Ramiro.
  • San Juan Hard Rock Café, Old San Juan.
  • Tantra is located at 356 Calle Fortaleza and serves international cuisine. Great creative and nightlife atmosphere. A warm, candlelit environment with great food and great martinis. Moderately priced, entrees run from around $13-17. +1 787 977-8141.
  • Tierra del Fuego, 3rd Level at Plaza las Américas, +1 787-294-7019. One of the best Argentinean restaurants where you will be able to savor a tender, juicy cut of meat prepared by chefs and cooks who work together with a warm staff of waiters and hostesses.
  • UVVA Restaurant, +1 787 727-3302, 1 Calle Tapia, Ocean Park. International creative cuisine by Chef Jose Vicente is served from 8AM-11PM. The ambiance is elegant and casual.
  • BUNS Burger Shop, 1214 Ashford Ave. (In front of Marriott Hotel. 11:30AM-4AM. Great burgers with high quality beef. Over 40 beers, some on tap.

Scampi

Scampi, also called Dublin Bay Prawn, or Norway Lobster, is an edible lobster of the order Decapoda (class Crustacea). It is widespread in the Mediterranean and northeastern Atlantic, from North Africa to Norway and Iceland, and as a gastronomic delicacy. Scampi is now the only extant species in the genus Nephrops, after several other species were moved to the closely related genus Metanephrops.

Shrimp Scampi is a food that includes various culinary preparations of certain crustaceans), such as Metanephrops, as well as shrimp or prawns. Shrimp Scampi preparation styles vary regionally. The United Kingdom legally defines scampi specifically as Nephrops norvegicus, Monkfish tail was sometimes illegally used and sold as scampi in the United Kingdom in the past contravening the Fish Labelling (Amendment) England Regulation 2005 and Schedule 1 of the Food Labelling Regulations 1996.

Scampi is the Italian plural of scampo, Nephrops norvegicus. In English, scampi is used as singular, plural, or uncountable. The Italian word may be derived from the Greek κάμπη kampē . Years after scampi became scarce. Due to scarcity, Italy, Greece, the United Kingdom and Spain would often substitute shrimp in scampi when required.

Scampi, or Langoustines or Norway lobsters – Nephrops norvegicus – are roughly the size of a large crayfish and fished from silty bottom regions of the open Atlantic Ocean, and parts of the Mediterranean. The fleshy tail of the Norway lobster is closer in both taste and texture to lobster and crayfish than prawn or shrimp.

Norway lobster are also known as Dublin Bay prawns, though the term "prawn" can be confusing since it is sometimes used to describe several varieties of shellfish: the first group includes members of the lobster family such as scampi while the second takes in large shrimp, particularly those that live in fresh water. However, in terms of biological classification, lobsters like scampi are of a different family from prawns/shrimp.

The food labelling laws (in Britain, for example) define "scampi" as Nephrops norvegicus.

According to Larousse Gastronomique, langoustine are delicate and need to be poached only for a few seconds in court-bouillon. When very fresh they have a slightly sweet flavour that is lost when they are frozen. They can be eaten plain, accompanied by melted butter.

In Britain the shelled tail meat is generally referred to as "scampi tails" or "wholetail scampi", although cheaper "re-formed scampi" can contain other parts together with other fish. It is served fried in batter or breadcrumbs and usually with chips and tartare sauce. It is widely available in supermarkets and restaurants, considered pub or snack food although factors reducing Scottish fishing catches generally can affect its availability.

In the United States, "shrimp scampi" is the menu name for shrimp in Italian-American cuisine (the actual word for "shrimp" in Italian is gambero or gamberetto, plural gamberi or gamberetti). "Scampi" by itself, is a dish of Nephrops norvegicus served in garlic butter and dry white wine, with cheese, served either with bread, or over pasta or rice, although sometimes just the shrimp alone. Most variants of the "shrimp scampi" come on pasta. The word "shrimp scampi" is construed as a style of preparation, and with variants such as "chicken scampi", "lobster scampi" and "scallop scampi". Lidia Bastianich: "In the United States, shrimps are available, not scampi, so the early immigrants prepared the shrimp they found in the scampi style they remembered."

Owing to the decline of fish stocks, British chefs including Heston Blumenthal and Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall are attempting to raise awareness of alternative seafoods, by championing scampi and other lesser-known seafood dishes as a more sustainable source of protein.

In the United States, National Shrimp Scampi Day occurs annually on April 29.

Wrap

A wrap is made with a soft flatbread rolled around a filling.

The usual flatbreads are wheat tortillas, lavash, or pita; the filling usually consists of cold sliced meat, poultry, or fish accompanied by shredded lettuce, diced tomato or pico de gallo, guacamole, sauteed mushrooms, bacon, grilled onions, cheese, and a sauce, such as ranch or honey mustard.

Mexicans, Armenians, Middle Easterners, Greeks and Turks have been eating wraps since before the 1900s. Mexicans refer to them as burritos, and they come in different ingredient varieties, primarily wheat flour or corn.

The wrap in its Western form probably comes from California, as a generalization of the Tex-Mex burrito, and became popular in the 1990s. It may have been invented and named at a southern California chain called "I Love Juicy" in the early 1980s. The OVO Bistro in NYC introduced its wrap sandwich in 1990 under the name "The King Edward," The Bobby Valentine Sports Gallery Cafe in Stamford, Connecticut is sometimes claimed to have invented the wrap at about the same time, but Valentine is diffident about it: "Well, that's legend and folklore, but until somebody disputes me or comes up with a better story, I'll say I invented the wrap." Beth Dolan of Stamford, Connecticut is the waitress credited for serving the first wrap after the restaurant had run out of bread. Moreover, Valentine's own story dates his use of the name 'wrap' to the mid-1990s, after it is documented in California.

A wrap is a variation of a sandwich: a sandwich has two distinct layers which are the top and bottom pieces of bread. A wrap, on the other hand, is one piece that completely surrounds the content of the wrap.

Restaurants such as Camille's Sidewalk Cafe, Sonic Drive-In, Jason's Deli, Buffalo Wild Wings, Subway, Chick-fil-A, Roly Poly and McAlister's Deli serve wraps. KFC now serves its chicken in a wrap as menu choice, with lettuce, mayonnaise and salsa. McDonald's has a snack wrap, with a fried, or grilled chicken strip, lettuce, Cheddar, and ranch dressing. Smokey Bones Barbeque and Grill has recently introduced a Portobello Chicken Wrap to broaden their selection of grilled menu items. Wraps are also very popular in Australia and New Zealand with chains such as Oporto and Burger Fuel amongst others serving them.

The UK wrap market has grown substantially since 2004 with all major sandwich and fast food stores now selling wraps.

Lechon

Lechón is a pork dish in several regions of the world, most specifically Spain and its former colonial possessions throughout the world. Lechón is a Spanish word referring to a roasted suckling pig. Lechón is a popular food in the Philippines, Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, North Sulawesi province of Indonesia, other Spanish-speaking nations in Latin America, and Spain. The dish features a whole roasted pig cooked over charcoal. Additionally, it is a national dish of the Philippines with Cebu being acknowledged by American chef Anthony Bourdain as having the best pig. It is also the national dish of Puerto Rico.

In most regions of the Philippines, lechón is prepared throughout the year for any special occasion, during festivals, and the holidays. After seasoning, the pig is cooked by skewering the entire animal, entrails removed, on a large stick and cooking it in a pit filled with charcoal. The pig is placed over the charcoal, and the stick or rod it is attached to is turned in a rotisserie action. The pig is roasted on all sides for several hours until done. The process of cooking and basting usually results in making the pork skin crisp and is a distinctive feature of the dish.

Sightseeing

  • El Castillo San Felipe del Morro. 9AM-6PM. A sixteenth-century citadel that lies on the northwestern-most point of the islet of San Juan, Puerto Rico. It is part of San Juan National Historic Site and was declared a World Heritage Site by the United Nations in 1983. $5 incl entrance to San Cristóbal, America The Beautiful pass includes up to 3 visitors.
  • El Castillo de San Cristóbal, +1 729-6960. 9AM-6PM. A fort built by the Spaniards to protect against land based attacks on the city of San Juan. It is part of San Juan National Historic Site. It covers 27 acres of land and is 150 ft tall. $5 incl entrance to El Morro, America The Beautiful pass includes up to 3 visitors.
  • Palacio de Santa Catalina "La Fortaleza" (or The Fortress in English) is the official residence of the Governor of Puerto Rico, who is Puerto Rico's head of Government. It was built between 1533 and 1540 to defend the harbor of San Juan. The structure is also known as El Palacio de Santa Catalina (or Palace of Santa Catalina). It is the oldest executive mansion in the New World. La Fortaleza was declared as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.
  • La Catedral de San Juan Bautista: contains the tomb of the Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de León. It was built in the 1520s, was soon wrecked by a hurricane, and then rebuilt in 1540. After being rebuilt, it was robbed in the late 1500s, and then, in 1615, it was damaged by a hurricane. In 1917, a lot of changes were made to restore the building. Tours are given daily from 8:30AM-4PM.
  • Castillo de San Jerónimo is a small fort located in the entrance to what is known today as Condado, Puerto Rico lagoon in San Juan. The fort defended San Juan from attacks by Sir Francis Drake in 1595, Sir George Clifford "Earl of Cumberland" in 1598 and Sir Ralph Abercromby.
  • Iglesia de San Jose dates back to 1523 when it was called the Church and Monastery of Saint Thomas Aquinas. Before Ponce de Leon was moved to the San Juan Catedral, his body was buried here for 300 years.
  • Ayuntamiento or Alcaldia or City Hall.
  • The municipal cemetery of Santa María Madgalena de Pazzis, located just outside the city walls.
  • Fuerte San Geronimo is a fort that was built to tighten defense within the city. There is a small museum inside.
  • Centro de Bellas Artes is the largest fine arts center in the Caribbean. Concerts, plays, and operas are hosted here.
  • Bacardi Rum Factory, +1 787 788-8400. M-Sa 9AM-4:30PM, Sunday from 10AM-3:30PM. Also called the "Cathedral of Rum" and covers 127 acres. Free tour, including a trolley ride around the premises.

Activities

Check out the beaches in Condado and Isla Verde.

A popular point of interest is Old San Juan, a 7-block area that has become popular for tourists and residents. The narrow streets of old San Juan are packed with people so it is recommended to experience Old San Juan by foot in order to avoid too much traffic. You can take a taxi for less than $20 from most hotels but for $0.75 you can also take the B21 bus which picks up from many locations near the hotels and is very easy to use.

Check out the parks in San Juan.

  • Central Park is the park to visit if you're looking for traditional activities such as jogging, tennis, baseball, etc.

  • La Marquesa Canopy Tour - Located about 30 minutes outside of San Juan in Guaynabo you can tour the La Marquesa Forest Reserve via zip line. It is a low impact experience suitable for people of all ages. Those who are up for extreme adventure travel may find this a little too easy.

  • Garfield, 7558 calle del cristo (go far west, +1 787 721-2500.

  • Munoz Rivera Park, Av. Ponce de León. Tu-Su 9AM-5PM. Located by the ocean and has beautiful trees and landscaping. A great place to tour by foot.
  • Parque de las Palomas overlooks La Princesa Jail. From this park you are able to see a great view of the mountains, harbor and the city.
  • The Casino of Puerto Rico is a large building with a chandelier and an open ballroom, built before World War I.

  • The Teatro Tapia, +1 787 721-0169 or +1 787 721-0180. Built in 1832, this is one of the oldest theaters in the Western Hemisphere. This building, which was named after Alejandro Tapia y Rivera, has been remodeled twice, once in 1949 and once in 1987. Plays, ballets, and other concerts and events are held here. There are a few things to do in Puerta de Tierra that don't have anything to do with what is in your hotel. There is a large park, a nice beach, and several smaller walkways to take short walks on.

  • Parque Luis Munoz Rivera

  • Parque del Tercer Milenio. Encompassing most of the beach and park area of Puerta de Tierra, this park also holds an athletic club with a track and plenty of field area for outdoor napping or picnics on the beach. The Balneario el Escambrón is the most accessible area of the beach to hotel guests, being a 5 minute leisurely walk from the hotels themselves. Once on the beach, there are great distant views of not only the San Cristobal fort, but El Morro as well, if there is no fog. Closer in and right next to the Kiosko Escambrón, a snack bar often playing loud salsa and serving up drinks to locals, is a lookout point that faces the water, where romantic couples often go to privately make out and gaze off into the ocean.
  • San Sebastian Festival, annually in January, the weekend before the Martin Luther King holiday, it is one of the most popular festivals in the Caribbean, full of activities, parades, food and live music. It began as a neighborhood event for Saint Sebastian; now it's the Festival de la Calle San Sebastian - celebrating the street, rather than the Saint. It is pleasant, if insanely crowded early in the afternoon, with artisans and families, but after dark the artisans flee and it's jam packed with drunken teenagers. Remarkably crime free, except for rocking cars, and the predictable outcome of 10,000 people drinking for 8 hours in a 6 block narrow street with no facilities.
  • Segway Tours, +1 787-598-9455. Daily 9AM-5PM, according to demand. Explore Old San Juan on a segway. 45 minute and 2 hour tours include riding lesson, individual segway and audio guide. $35-$70. Off season in September.

  • The Butterfly People, 257 Calle de la Cruz, Old San Juan, +1 787-723-2432. Real butterflies encased in acrylic. Stunning. Go to see it, even if you don't buy.

  • Plaza las Américas, "The Center of it All", biggest mall in the Caribbean, containing more than 300 stores anchored by the world's largest JC Penney, plus Macy's, Lacoste, American Eagle, A|X and Sears. It has a movie theater and restaurants such as Chili's, Macaroni Grill, Margarita's and Tierra del Fuego. If you need or want to visit a good example of a modern, enclosed mall from the U.S. mainland, this won't disappoint.
  • Old San Juan, Shopping in Old San Juan is diverse, with retailers scattered among many narrow streets. Stores include many fine jewelers, arts, crafts and mercantil shops, at least one drug store, and a few branded "outlets". You'll also find numerous cafes and a few fine restaurants. For walkers, the humidity and tropical sun may make the mid-late afternoon temperatures a bit oppressive. Alternatives include going early as stores open or catching a free trolley winding throughout the area, with opportunities to get off at marked stops wherever desired. The trolley tends to stay very full on afternoons when cruise ships are in.

Teams based in San Juan have been notably successful in athletic competition. The Santurce Crabbers won the National Superior Basketball League championship in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2003 during this period being recognized as a dynasty. The San Juan Senators and the Santurce Crabbers were the two major baseball teams in the city, winning the championship of the Puerto Rican Professional Baseball League a total of seventeen times. The Santurce Crabbers are located third among teams with more championships in the Caribbean Series, winning championships in the 1951, 1953, 1955, 1993 and 2000 editions of the tournament. The city has also been the host of events within the sports community; some examples include:

  • Host of the 1966 Central American and Caribbean Games.
  • Host of the 1979 Pan American Games.
  • Has been host of the Caribbean World Series nine times.
  • Major League Baseball's Montreal Expos played 22 home games at Hiram Bithorn Stadium in both 2003 and 2004. The team also briefly considered moving permanently to San Juan before relocating to Washington, D.C.
  • Hosted the 2006, 2009 and 2013 World Baseball Classic at the Hiram Bithorn Stadium.
  • Host of the 1974 FIBA World Championship (basketball).
  • Has been host of the FIBA Americas Championship five times (1980, 1993, 1999, 2003, 2009).
  • The first edition of World Wrestling Entertainment's pay per view New Year's Revolution was held at the José Miguel Agrelot Coliseum in January 2005.
  • The Latin American Regional Special Olympics in February 2010
  • Host of Major League Baseball's 2010 "San Juan Series", three games of the Mets at Marlins held on June 28–30, 2010 at Hiram Bithorn Stadium.

The recently built $28 million San Juan Natatorium is beginning to attract islandwide and regional swim meets, as well winter training by top-rated mainland U.S. colleges and universities, including the United States Military Academy at West Point and the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis.

In July 2007, the San Juan Golf Academy and its driving range began operating atop the city's former sanitary landfill in Puerto Nuevo and will eventually include the city's first and only 9-hole golf course.

Corned beef

Corned beef is a salt-cured beef product. The term comes from the treatment of the meat with large grained rock salt, also called "corns" of salt. It features as an ingredient in many cuisines. Most recipes include nitrates or nitrites, which convert the natural myoglobin in beef to nitrosomyoglobin, giving a pink color. Nitrates and nitrites reduce the risk of dangerous botulism during curing by inhibiting the growth of Clostridium botulinum spores. Beef cured with salt only has a gray color and is sometimes called "New England corned beef". Often, sugar and spices are also added to recipes for corned beef.

It was popular during World War I and World War II, when fresh meat was rationed. It also remains especially popular in Canada in a variety of dishes, perhaps most prominently Montreal-style smoked meat.

Although the exact beginnings of corned beef are unknown, it most likely came about when people began preserving meat through salt-curing. Evidence of its legacy is apparent in numerous cultures, including ancient Europe and the Middle East. The word corn derives from Old English and is used to describe any small, hard particles or grains. In the case of "corned beef", the word may refer to the coarse, granular salts used to cure the beef. The word "corned" may also refer to the corns of potassium nitrate, also known as saltpeter, which were formerly used to preserve the meat.

In North America, corned beef dishes are associated with traditional Irish cuisine. However, considerable debate remains about the association of corned beef with Ireland. Mark Kurlansky, in his book Salt, states that the Irish produced a salted beef around the Middle Ages that was the "forerunner of what today is known as Irish corned beef" and in the 17th century, the English named the Irish salted beef "corned beef".

Some say until the wave of 18th-century Irish immigration to the United States, many of the ethnic Irish had not begun to consume corned beef dishes as seen today. The popularity of corned beef compared to bacon among the immigrant Irish may have been due to corned beef being considered a luxury product in their native land, while it was cheaply and readily available in America.

The Jewish population produced similar salt-cured meat product made from beef brisket which the Irish immigrants purchased as corned beef from Jewish butchers. This may have been facilitated by the close cultural interactions and collaboration of these two diverse cultures in the United States' main 19th- and 20th-century immigrant port of entry, New York City.

Canned corned beef has long become one of the standard meals included in military field ration packs around the world, due to its simplicity and instant preparation in such rations. One example is the American Meal, Ready-to-Eat pack. Astronaut John Young sneaked a contraband corned beef sandwich on board Gemini 3, hiding it in a pocket of his spacesuit.

The dish, corned beef and cabbage, is known by a variety of names around the globe. In the United States around WWI, it was often called Red Mike and Violets, "Red Mike" referring to corned beef, and "Violets" referring to cabbage and any other accompanying vegetable.

Barbecue

Barbecue or barbeque is both a cooking method and an apparatus/machine. Barbecuing is done slowly over low, indirect heat and the food is flavored by the smoking process, while grilling, a related process, is generally done quickly over moderate-to-high direct heat that produces little smoke.

Barbecue can refer to the cooking method itself, the meat cooked this way, the cooking apparatus/machine used (the "barbecue grill" or simply "barbecue"), or to a type of social event featuring this type of cooking. Barbecuing is usually done outdoors by smoking the meat over wood or charcoal. Restaurant barbecue may be cooked in large, specially-designed brick or metal ovens. Barbecue is practiced in many areas of the world and there are numerous regional variations.

Barbecuing techniques include smoking, roasting or baking, braising and grilling. The original technique is cooking using smoke at low temperatures and long cooking times (several hours). Baking uses an oven to convection cook with moderate temperatures for an average cooking time of about an hour. Braising combines direct, dry heat charbroiling on a ribbed surface with a broth-filled pot for moist heat. Grilling is done over direct, dry heat, usually over a hot fire for a few minutes. 

The English word "barbecue" and its cognates in other languages come from the Spanish word barbacoa. Etymologists believe this to be derived from barabicu found in the language of the Arawak people of the Caribbean and the Timucua people of Florida; it has entered some European languages in the form of barbacoa. The Oxford English Dictionary traces the word to La Hispaniola and translates it as a "framework of sticks set upon posts". Gonzalo Fernández De Oviedo y Valdés, a Spanish explorer, was the first to use the word "barbecoa" in print in Spain in 1526 in the Diccionario de la Lengua Española (2nd Edition) of the Real Academia Española. After Columbus landed in the Americas in 1492, the Spaniards apparently found Tainos roasting meat over a grill consisting of a wooden framework resting on sticks above a fire. The flames and smoke rose and enveloped the meat, giving it a certain flavor.

Traditional barbacoa involves digging a hole in the ground and placing some meat—usually a whole lamb—above a pot so the juices can be used to make a broth. It is then covered with maguey leaves and coal, and set alight. The cooking process takes a few hours. Olaudah Equiano, an African abolitionist, described this method of roasting alligators among the Mosquito People (Miskito people) on his journeys to Cabo Gracias a Dios in his narrative The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano.

Linguists have suggested the word barbacoa migrated from the Caribbean and into other languages and cultures; it moved from Caribbean dialects into Spanish, then Portuguese, French, and English. According to the OED, the first recorded use of the word in English was a verb in 1661, in Edmund Hickeringill's Jamaica Viewed: "Some are slain, And their flesh forthwith Barbacu'd and eat". The word barbecue was published in English in 1672 as a verb from the writings of John Lederer, following his travels in the North American southeast in 1669-70. The first known use of the word as a noun was in 1697 by the British buccaneer William Dampier. In his New Voyage Round the World, Dampier wrote, " ... and lay there all night, upon our Borbecu's, or frames of Sticks, raised about 3 foot from the Ground".

Samuel Johnson's 1756 dictionary gave the following definitions:

  • "To Barbecue – a term for dressing a whole hog" (attestation to Pope)
  • "Barbecue – a hog dressed whole"

While the standard modern English spelling of the word is barbecue, variations including barbeque and truncations such as bar-b-q or BBQ may also be found. The spelling barbeque is given in Merriam-Webster and the Oxford Dictionaries as a variant. In the southeastern United States, the word barbecue is used predominantly as a noun referring to roast pork, while in the southwestern states cuts of beef are often cooked.

Because the word barbecue came from native groups, Europeans gave it "savage connotations." This association with barbarians and "savages" is strengthened by Edmund Hickeringill's work Jamaica Viewed: with All the Ports, Harbours, and their Several Soundings, Towns, and Settlements through its descriptions of cannibalism. However, according to Andrew Warnes, there is very little proof that Hickeringill's tale of cannibalism in the Caribbean is even remotely true. Another notable false depiction of cannibalistic barbecues appears in Theodor de Bry's Great Voyages, which in Warnes's eyes, "present smoke cookery as a custom quintessential to an underlying savagery ... that everywhere contains within it a potential for cannibalistic violence." Today, those in the U.S. associate barbecue with "classic Americana."

British usage, barbecuing refers to a fast cooking process done directly over high heat, while grilling refers to cooking under a source of direct, moderate-to-high heat—known in the United States as broiling. In American English usage, grilling refers to a fast process over high heat while barbecuing refers to a slow process using indirect heat or hot smoke, similar to some forms of roasting. In a typical U.S. home grill, food is cooked on a grate directly over hot charcoal, while in a U.S. barbecue the coals are dispersed to the sides or at a significant distance from the grate. Its South American versions are the southern Brazilian churrasco and the Argentine asado.

Barbecue cooking using smoke at low temperatures Barbecuing encompasses four or five distinct types of cooking techniques. The original technique is cooking using smoke at low temperatures—usually around 240–280 °F or 115–145 °C—and significantly longer cooking times (several hours), known as smoking. Another technique, known as baking, used a masonry oven or baking oven that uses convection to cook meats and starches with moderate temperatures for an average cooking time of about an hour. Braising combines direct, dry heat charbroiling on a ribbed surface with a broth-filled pot for moist heat. Using this technique, cooking occurs at various speeds, starting fast, slowing down, then speeding up again, lasting for a few hours.

Grilling is done over direct, dry heat, usually over a hot fire over 500°F for a few minutes. Grilling may be done over wood, charcoal, gas, or electricity. The time difference between barbecuing and grilling is because of the temperature difference; at low temperatures used for barbecuing, meat takes several hours to reach the desired internal temperature.

The term barbecue is also used to designate a flavor added to food items, the most prominent of which are potato chips.

Electric Daisy Carnival

Electric Daisy Carnival, commonly known as EDC, is one of the biggest electronic dance music festivals in the world, based off attendance, with its flagship event held annually in Las Vegas, Nevada.

The event primarily features electronic dance producers and DJs such as Armin van Buuren, Dimitri Vegas & Like Mike, Yellow Claw, and Tiësto. The festival incorporates all kinds of electronic music.

Since its inception, EDC has spread to various venues across the United States as well as abroad, including Mexico, Puerto Rico, the UK, Brazil, Japan and India.

In 2009, EDC became a two-day event, and in 2011 a three-day event in Las Vegas that drew 230,000 people. In 2015 it drew more than 400,000 over three days (134,000 per day).

The first Electric Daisy Carnival rave was held in the early 1990s at an open field in Pacoima, in Los Angeles, California, by Gary Richards and DJ Steve Kool-Aid (real name: Stephen Enos). In the early years, several southern California venues played host to the annual electronic music festival: Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum and Exposition Park in Los Angeles, National Orange Show Events Center in San Bernardino, Queen Mary Events Park in Long Beach, Lake Dolores Waterpark in Barstow, Hansen Dam in Lake View Terrace, and the International Agri-Center in Tulare.

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