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Travel Guide and Information about Miami

Poke

Poke /poʊˈkeɪ/ (Hawaiian for "to section" or "to slice or cut") is a raw fish salad served as an appetizer in Hawaiian cuisine, and sometimes as a main course. Traditional forms are aku (an oily tuna) and he'e (octopus). He'e (octopus) poke is usually called by its Japanese name "Tako" Poke, except in places like the island of Ni'ihau where the Hawaiian language is spoken. Increasingly popular ahi poke is generally made with yellowfin tuna. Adaptations may feature raw salmon or various shellfish as a main ingredient served raw with the common "poke" seasonings.

Poke began with fishermen seasoning the cut-offs from their catch to serve as a snack. Traditional poke seasonings have been heavily influenced by Japanese and other Asian cuisines. These include soy sauce, green onions, and sesame oil. Others include furikake chopped dried or fresh chili pepper, limu (seaweed), sea salt, inamona (roasted crushed candlenut), fish eggs, wasabi, and Maui onions. Other variations of poke may include cured hee (octopus), other types of raw tuna, raw salmon and various kinds of shellfish.

Traditional Hawaiian poke may consist of cubed raw fish, maui onions, Inamona (a condiment made of roasted, salted candlenut), Limu (algae), soy sauce, green onions, or sesame oil. Some of the more contemporary variations can also include seaweed, Roe (fish eggs) wasabi, dried or fresh chilli, toasted macadamia nut, Furikake and can be served alone or on top of a bed of white rice, pineapple, Sushi-meshi (seasoned rice) or red cabbage. The possibilities for variation are endless, however, what gives Ahi Poke its name is the yellowfin "Ahi" tuna used.

The traditional Hawaiian poke consists of fish that has been gutted, skinned, and deboned. It is sliced across the backbone as fillet, then served with traditional condiments such as sea salt, candlenut, seaweed, and limu.

According to the food historian Rachel Laudan, the present form of poke became popular around the 1970s. It used skinned, deboned, and filleted raw fish served with Hawaiian salt, seaweed, and roasted, ground kukui nut meat. This form of poke is still common in the Hawaiian islands.

Beginning around 2012, poke became increasingly popular in the mainland United States. A number of poke restaurants—mostly but not exclusively fast casual restaurants—became popular. From 2014 to mid-2016, "the number of Hawaiian restaurants on Foursquare, which includes those that serve poke," doubled, going from 342 to 700. These restaurants have been creating traditional as well as unique, modern versions of the dish. These variations can include avocado, ponzu sauce, teriyaki sauce, mushrooms, crispy onions, pickled jalapeno, Sriracha sauce, cilantro, pineapple or cucumber. The contemporary poke restaurants are mainly fast casual style places where the dish is fully customizable from the base to the marinade on the fish. They may use other seafood but ahi tuna is the most popular. There is a three day "I Love Poke" festival to celebrate the dish and its many variations.

Raw fish dishes similar to poke that are often served in Europe are fish carpaccio and fish tartare. Also similar to poke are Korean hoedeopbap, marinated raw tuna served over rice, and Peruvian ceviche. Japanese sashimi also consists of raw seafood; other similar Japanese dishes are zuke don, a donburi dish topped with cured fish along with avocado topped with furikake, and kaisendon, a more elaborate version served with additional non-fish toppings.

Corn dog

A corn dog is a sausage (usually a hot dog) on a stick that has been coated in a thick layer of cornmeal batter and deep fried.

Newly arrived German Texan sausage-makers, finding resistance to the sausages they used to make, have been credited with introducing the corn dog to the United States, though the serving stick came later. A US patent filed in 1927, granted in 1929, for a Combined Dipping, Cooking, and Article Holding Apparatus, describes corn dogs, among other fried food impaled on a stick; it reads in part:

In 300 Years of Kitchen Collectibles, author Linda Campbell Franklin states that a "Krusty Korn Dog" baker machine appeared in the 1929 Albert Pick-L. Barth wholesale catalog of hotel and restaurant supplies. The 'korn dogs' were baked in a corn batter and resembled ears of corn when cooked.

A number of current corn dog vendors claim responsibility for the invention and/or popularization of the corn dog. Carl and Neil Fletcher lay such a claim, having introduced their "Corny Dogs" at the Texas State Fair sometime between 1938 and 1942. The Pronto Pup vendors at the Minnesota State Fair claim to have invented the corn dog in 1941. Cozy Dog Drive-in, in Springfield, Illinois, claims to have been the first to serve corn dogs on sticks, on June 16, 1946. Also in 1946, Dave Barham opened the first location of Hot Dog on a Stick at Muscle Beach in Santa Monica, California.

Corn dogs are often served as street food or as fast food. For the best and freshest preparation, some vendors or restaurateurs dip and fry their dogs just before serving. Some corn dog purveyors sell pre-made frozen corn dogs, which have been thawed and then fried again or browned in an oven.

Corn dogs can also be found at almost any supermarket in North America as frozen food that can be heated and served. Pre-made frozen corn dogs can also be heated in a microwave oven, but the cornbread coating will lack texture.

One cheesy variation is prepared either with melted cheese between the hot dog and the breading or by using a cheese-filled hot dog.

Another version is the "cornbrat" which is a corn dog made with bratwurst instead of a wiener or hot dog. They are also sold using different meats in the dog, such as pork and turkey.

Small corn dogs, known as "corn puppies", "mini corn dogs", or "corn dog nuggets", are a variation served in some restaurants, generally on the children's menu or at fast food establishments. A serving includes multiple pieces, usually 10. In contrast to their larger counterparts, corn puppies are normally served stickless as finger food.

A breakfast version of the corn dog features a breakfast sausage in place of the hot dog, and pancake batter in place of the cornmeal. This variation is commonly called a "pancake on a stick". It was formerly served by the drive-in restaurant Sonic, but now is made by companies such as Jimmy Dean.

Both vegetarian corn dogs and corn dog nuggets are made as meatless alternatives by many of the same companies that produce vegetarian hot dogs.

National Corndog Day is a celebration of the corn dog, tater tots, and American beer that occurs on the first Saturday of March madness of every year.

Eat and drink

Foodies and chefs alike herald Miami for its unique New World cuisine. Created in the 1990s, the cuisine alternatively known as New World, Nuevo Latino or Florribean cuisine blends local produce, Latin American and Caribbean culinary tradition and the technical skills required in European cooking. Nuevo Latino is said to be the brainchild of four chefs: Allen Susser, Norman Van Aken, Mark Militello and Douglas Rodriguez. All of them still work in Miami and most of them work at the restaurants they created in the 1990s. New World is not restricted to these chefs’ menus. This cuisine influences several restaurants around the city to this day.

Miami may be known for its Latin cuisine but there are other different kinds of restaurants to be found around the city. In addition to stand-alone Chinese, Japanese, Middle Eastern, and Italian (among others) restaurants, there are cafés, steakhouses and restaurants operating from boutique hotels, as well as chain restaurants such as TGI Fridays and Ben & Jerry’s.

Miami is known for having nightclubs double as restaurants throughout the city. Most of these restaurants, such as Tantra (which had one of their chefs recently appear on Top Chef: Miami), BED and the Pearl Restaurant and Champagne Lounge (attached to Nikki Beach), are located throughout South Beach. However, some of these restaurants/nightclubs like Grass Lounge can be found in the Design District (north of downtown but south of North Miami).

If many of Miami’s premiere restaurants don’t fit into your daily budget, consider eating during Miami Restaurant Month (better known as Miami Spice) in August and September. This year at 80 select restaurants, lunch costs $22 and dinner is $35.

Miami’s dining scene reflects burgeoning diversity, mixing exotic newcomer restaurants with long-standing institutions, often seasoned by Latin influence and hot winds of the Caribbean. New World cuisine, a culinary counterpart to accompany Miami’s New World Symphony, provides a loose fusion of Latin, Asian, and Caribbean flavors utilizing fresh, area-grown ingredients. Innovative restaurateurs and chefs similarly reel in patrons with Floribbean-flavored seafood fare, while keeping true to down-home Florida favorites.

Don't be fooled by the plethora of super lean model types you're likely to see posing throughout Miami. Contrary to popular belief, dining in this city is as much a sport as the in-line skating on Ocean Drive. With over 6,000 restaurants to choose from, dining out in Miami has become a passionate pastime for locals and visitors alike. Its star chefs have fused Californian-Asian with Caribbean and Latin elements to create a world-class flavor all its own: Floribbean. Think mango chutney splashed over fresh swordfish or a spicy sushi sauce served alongside Peruvian ceviche.

Whatever you're craving, Miami's got it—with the exception of decent Chinese food and a New York-style slice of pizza. If you're craving a scene with your steak, then South Beach is the place to be. Like many cities in Europe and Latin America, it is fashionable to dine late in South Beach, preferably after 9PM, sometimes as late as midnight. Service on South Beach is notoriously slow and arrogant, but it comes with the turf (of course, it is possible to find restaurants that defy the notoriety and actually pride themselves on friendly service). On the mainland—especially in Coral Gables, and, more recently, downtown and on Brickell Avenue—you can also experience fine, creative dining without the pretense.

There are several Peruvian restaurants at SW 88th Street and SW 137th Avenue in Kendale Lakes. Take the 88 or 288 buses from Dadeland North train station. This is kind of out of the way, but it is worth it.

Sites located in Miami Beach should be added to the appropriate district article there, not here.

  • La Carreta, SW 8th St, +1 305 444-7501. Open 24hrs a day. Cuban. The flagship restaurant of a small chain of Cuban restaurants (including one location at Miami International Airport). It should be noted that the majority of staff only speak limited English but menus are available in both English and Spanish. $5–$22 per person, per meal.

  • Chef Allen’s, 19088 NE 29th Ave, +1 305 935-2900. Sun-Thu 6PM-10PM, Fri-Sat 6PM-11PM. Allen Susser was named the best chef in the South in 1994 by the James Beard Foundation. A perfect place to try New World cuisine. Dinner jackets suggested. $9–$46 (the tasting menu is $75 per person).

  • Casa Tua, 1700 James Ave, +1 305 673-1010. Lunch Mon-Fri 11:30AM-3PM, dinner Mon-Sat 7PM-12AM. Italian. Casa Tua is proud of the fact that there is no outside signage outside its restaurant. If the restaurant decides to advertise out front, it’s not going to be soon. Reservations are required to get inside, but make sure you can find the restaurant first or you might get a headache attempting to get to dinner. $12–$100 per person, per meal.

  • Ola, 5061 Biscayne Blvd (in the Sanctuary Hotel, +1 305 695-9125. Mon-Thu 6PM-12AM, Fri-Sat 6PM-2AM. Nuevo Latino. Chef Douglas Rodriguez’ restaurant, Of Latin America, is a mixture of Spanish and Latin American culinary traditions. Reservations recommended. $20–$35 per person, per meal.

  • Ortanique on the Mile, 278 Miracle Mile (near Actor’s Playhouse, +1 305 446-7710. Mon-Tue 6PM-10PM, Wed-Sat 6PM-11PM, Sun 5:30PM–9:30PM. New World. One of three Ortanique restaurants (the other two are located in Washington, D.C. and Las Vegas. The food has a mixture of Caribbean and French influences. Reservations are requested. $19–$36 per person, per meal.

  • Azul, 500 Brickell Key Dr, +1 305 913-8358. Award winning blend of Mediterranean flavors with Asian influences.
  • Bongos Cuban Cafe, +1 786 777-2100. The café is owned by Gloria and Emilio Estefan and shines with Latin flavor. The music is Latin as well as the food and majority of the crowd and employees. It is a restaurant by day and club at night. Besides Miami, there are locations in South Beach, Hollywood FL, and Orlando FL.

Scampi

Scampi, also called Dublin Bay Prawn, or Norway Lobster, is an edible lobster of the order Decapoda (class Crustacea). It is widespread in the Mediterranean and northeastern Atlantic, from North Africa to Norway and Iceland, and as a gastronomic delicacy. Scampi is now the only extant species in the genus Nephrops, after several other species were moved to the closely related genus Metanephrops.

Shrimp Scampi is a food that includes various culinary preparations of certain crustaceans), such as Metanephrops, as well as shrimp or prawns. Shrimp Scampi preparation styles vary regionally. The United Kingdom legally defines scampi specifically as Nephrops norvegicus, Monkfish tail was sometimes illegally used and sold as scampi in the United Kingdom in the past contravening the Fish Labelling (Amendment) England Regulation 2005 and Schedule 1 of the Food Labelling Regulations 1996.

Scampi is the Italian plural of scampo, Nephrops norvegicus. In English, scampi is used as singular, plural, or uncountable. The Italian word may be derived from the Greek κάμπη kampē . Years after scampi became scarce. Due to scarcity, Italy, Greece, the United Kingdom and Spain would often substitute shrimp in scampi when required.

Scampi, or Langoustines or Norway lobsters – Nephrops norvegicus – are roughly the size of a large crayfish and fished from silty bottom regions of the open Atlantic Ocean, and parts of the Mediterranean. The fleshy tail of the Norway lobster is closer in both taste and texture to lobster and crayfish than prawn or shrimp.

Norway lobster are also known as Dublin Bay prawns, though the term "prawn" can be confusing since it is sometimes used to describe several varieties of shellfish: the first group includes members of the lobster family such as scampi while the second takes in large shrimp, particularly those that live in fresh water. However, in terms of biological classification, lobsters like scampi are of a different family from prawns/shrimp.

The food labelling laws (in Britain, for example) define "scampi" as Nephrops norvegicus.

According to Larousse Gastronomique, langoustine are delicate and need to be poached only for a few seconds in court-bouillon. When very fresh they have a slightly sweet flavour that is lost when they are frozen. They can be eaten plain, accompanied by melted butter.

In Britain the shelled tail meat is generally referred to as "scampi tails" or "wholetail scampi", although cheaper "re-formed scampi" can contain other parts together with other fish. It is served fried in batter or breadcrumbs and usually with chips and tartare sauce. It is widely available in supermarkets and restaurants, considered pub or snack food although factors reducing Scottish fishing catches generally can affect its availability.

In the United States, "shrimp scampi" is the menu name for shrimp in Italian-American cuisine (the actual word for "shrimp" in Italian is gambero or gamberetto, plural gamberi or gamberetti). "Scampi" by itself, is a dish of Nephrops norvegicus served in garlic butter and dry white wine, with cheese, served either with bread, or over pasta or rice, although sometimes just the shrimp alone. Most variants of the "shrimp scampi" come on pasta. The word "shrimp scampi" is construed as a style of preparation, and with variants such as "chicken scampi", "lobster scampi" and "scallop scampi". Lidia Bastianich: "In the United States, shrimps are available, not scampi, so the early immigrants prepared the shrimp they found in the scampi style they remembered."

Owing to the decline of fish stocks, British chefs including Heston Blumenthal and Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall are attempting to raise awareness of alternative seafoods, by championing scampi and other lesser-known seafood dishes as a more sustainable source of protein.

In the United States, National Shrimp Scampi Day occurs annually on April 29.

Sightseeing

Sites located in Miami Beach should be added to the appropriate district article there, not here.

  • Zoo Miami, 12400 SW 152nd St, +1 305 251-0400. Open daily 9:30AM–5:30PM. Miami. Largest and oldest zoological garden in Florida. It houses over 1,200 wild animals and is a free range zoo. Its climate allows it to keep a wide variety of animals from Asia, Australia and Africa like no other zoo in the country.

  • Jungle Island, +1 305 258-6453. 1111 Jungle Island Trail, Miami. Lush tropical garden that features animal shows and exhibits. Great outing for the family to enjoy.

  • Miami Seaquarium, 4400 Rickenbacker Causeway, +1 305 361-5705. This 38 acre tropical island paradise features marine shows and marine life exhibits. Expect to stay around two to three hours touring the large aquarium. Just ten minutes from downtown Miami and directly adjacent to Fairchild Tropical Botanical Garden.

  • Fairchild Tropical Botanical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road, Coral Gables, Florida 33156, +1 305 667-1651. Garden hours are 7:30AM to 4:30PM, Monday through Sunday. The Garden opens at 9:30AM on festival days and is closed on Christmas Day, December 25. Fairchild Tropical Botanical Garden is home to the only outdoor rainforest in North America, several famous outdoor art installations the January Chocolate Festival, and world-famous Mango Festival (every June or July featuring information on and samples of hundreds of different mango varieties). Adults = $25,Seniors (65 and over) = $18,Children 6-17 = $12, Children 5 and under = Free, Fairchild members = Free.

In addition to such annual festivals like Calle Ocho Festival and Carnaval Miami, Miami is home to many entertainment venues, theaters, museums, parks and performing arts centers. The newest addition to the Miami arts scene is the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, the second-largest performing arts center in the United States after the Lincoln Center in New York City, and is the home of the Florida Grand Opera. Within it are the Ziff Ballet Opera House, the center's largest venue, the Knight Concert Hall, the Carnival Studio Theater and the Peacock Rehearsal Studio. The center attracts many large-scale operas, ballets, concerts, and musicals from around the world and is Florida's grandest performing arts center. Other performing arts venues in Miami include the Gusman Center for the Performing Arts, Coconut Grove Playhouse, Colony Theatre, Lincoln Theatre, Actor's Playhouse at the Miracle Theatre Manuel Artime Theater, Playground Theatre, Wertheim Performing Arts Center, the Fair Expo Center and the Bayfront Park Amphitheater for outdoor music events.

The city attracts a large number of musicians, singers, actors, dancers, and orchestral players. Miami has numerous orchestras, symphonies and performing art conservatories. Some of these include the Florida Grand Opera, FIU School of Music, Frost School of Music, Miami Wind Symphony, New World School of the Arts, as well as the music, theater and art schools of the city's many universities and schools.

Miami is also a major fashion center, home to models and some of the top modeling agencies in the world. Miami is also host to many fashion shows and events, including the annual Miami Fashion Week and the Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Miami held in the Wynwood Art District.

Activities

Sites located in Miami Beach should be added to the appropriate district article there, not here.

Sites located in Miami Beach should be added to the appropriate district article there, not here.

Remember that sales tax is 7% in Miami.

There are a number of shopping malls in Miami. Beyond that, there are prestigious shopping districts in South Beach; see that article for details.

Miami's main four sports teams are the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League, the Miami Heat of the National Basketball Association, the Miami Marlins of Major League Baseball, and the Florida Panthers of the National Hockey League. As well as having all four major professional teams, Miami is also home to the Major League Soccer expansion team led by David Beckham, Sony Ericsson Open for professional tennis, numerous greyhound racing tracks, marinas, jai alai venues, and golf courses. The city streets has hosted professional auto races, the Miami Indy Challenge and later the Grand Prix Americas. The Homestead-Miami Speedway oval hosts NASCAR national races.

The Heat and the Marlins play within Miami's city limits. The Heat play at the American Airlines Arena in Downtown Miami. The Miami Marlins home ballpark is Marlins Park, located in Little Havana on the site of the old Orange Bowl stadium.

The Miami Dolphins play at Hard Rock Stadium in suburban Miami Gardens. The Florida Panthers play in nearby Sunrise at the BB&T Center. Miami FC of the North American Soccer League, the second tier of the American soccer pyramid, play at FIU Stadium, and the Fort Lauderdale Strikers play at Lockhart Stadium in nearby Fort Lauderdale, also in the North American Soccer League. Miami is also home to Paso Fino horses, where competitions are held at Tropical Park Equestrian Center.

The Orange Bowl, a member of the Bowl Championship Series, hosts their college football championship games at Hard Rock Stadium. The stadium has also hosted the Super Bowl; the Miami metro area has hosted the game a total of ten times (five Super Bowls at the current Hard Rock Stadium, including Super Bowl XLI and five at the Miami Orange Bowl), tying New Orleans for the most games.

Miami is also the home of many college sports teams. The two largest are the University of Miami Hurricanes, whose football team plays at Hard Rock Stadium, and Florida International University Panthers whose football team plays at FIU Stadium.

The following table shows the Miami area major professional teams and Division I teams with an average attendance of more than 10,000:

ClubSportLeagueVenue (Capacity) AttendanceLeague Championships
Miami DolphinsFootballNational Football LeagueHard Rock Stadium (80,120)70,035Super Bowl (2) — 1972, 1973
Miami HurricanesFootballNCAA D-I (ACC)Hard Rock Stadium (80,120)53,837 National titles (5) — 1983, 1987, 1989, 1991, 2001
Miami MarlinsBaseballMajor League BaseballMarlins Park (36,742)21,386World Series (2) — 1997, 2003
Miami HeatBasketballNational Basketball AssociationAmerican Airlines Arena (19,600)19,710NBA Finals (3) — 2006, 2012, 2013
FIU PanthersFootballNCAA D-I (Conference USA)FIU Stadium (23,500)15,453 None
Florida PanthersHockeyNational Hockey LeagueBB&T Center (19,250)10,250None
Miami MLS teamSoccerMajor League SoccerMiami MLS StadiumNone None

Corn on the cob

Corn on the cob is a culinary term used for a cooked ear of freshly picked maize from a cultivar of sweet corn. Sweet corn is the most common variety of maize eaten directly off the cob. The ear is picked while the endosperm is in the "milk stage" so that the kernels are still tender. Ears of corn are steamed or boiled, usually without their green husks, or roasted with them. The husk leaves are in any case removed before serving.

Corn on the cob is normally eaten while still warm. It is often seasoned with salt and buttered before serving. Some diners use specialized skewers, thrust into the ends of the cob, to hold the ear while eating without touching the hot and sticky kernels.

The most common methods for cooking corn on the cob are frying, boiling, roasting, and grilling. Corn on the cob can be grilled directly in its husk, or it can be husked first and then wrapped in aluminum foil. When oven roasting, cooking the corn in the husk directly on the rack is recommended. When roasting or grilling corn on the cob, the cook can first peel the husk back to rub the corn with oil or melted butter, then re-secure the husk around the corn with a string.

Common condiments and seasonings for corn on the cob include butter, salt, and black pepper.

Lillian Eichler Watson, in a 1921 etiquette book, described corn on the cob as "without a doubt one of the most difficult foods to eat gracefully." She added that "it is entirely permissible to use the fingers in eating corn, holding it lightly at each end; sometimes a napkin is used in holding it." Sometimes, however, a short sharp knife would be provided that each diner could use to cut or scrape the kernels from the cob for later eating. She described this as "by far the most satisfactory method" of eating corn on the cob.

Some etiquette books recommend salting and buttering the corn a section at a time just before eating that section, which helps to minimize the mess on the diner's face and hands. Butter dripping down the diner's chin and kernels getting stuck in-between teeth may be a source of embarrassment for the diner.

Cob Shanks are eating utensils used to hold corn on the cob. Cob Shanks have been used since ancient times, ranging from articles made of wood found in ethnographic museums to precious tableware made of silver.

Other utensils for eating corn on the cob include specialty knives from removing the kernels, brushes for removing the silk and knives for buttering.

Corn was eaten by Native American tribes before European settlers arrived in the Americas. The Maya ate corn as a staple food crop and ate it off the cob, either roasting or boiling it. Aboriginal Canadians in southern parts of Canada also eat corn.

Ultra Music Festival

Ultra Music Festival is an annual outdoor electronic music festival that takes place during March in the city of Miami, Florida. The festival was founded in 1999 by Russell Faibisch and Alex Omes and is named after the 1997 Depeche Mode album, Ultra.

Ultra Music Festival is held in Downtown Miami at Bayfront Park. It was a one-day festival from 1999 to 2006, then grew into a two-day weekend event from 2007 to 2010. Since 2011, Ultra has taken place across three days (Friday through Sunday) during the month of March. In 2012, a record attendance of 155,000 people attended the festival. In 2013, for the first time in Ultra’s history, the festival took place across two consecutive weekends welcoming a combined attendance of 330,000 people. In 2014, the festival returned to its original one weekend format, selling out pre sale tickets in under five minutes. The most recent edition of Ultra, in 2017, welcomed 165,000 people to the festival.

As of 2016, Ultra Music Festival is home to seven stages that span the picturesque Bayfront Park which include the Main Stage, the Live stage, the MegaStructure, the Worldwide stage, the UMF Radio stage, the Resistance stage, and the Oasis stage. Although they share names, Ultra Music Festival was not directly tied to Ultra Records, an electronic music record label. However, the two entities did announce a "global alliance" in August 2012, which would allow them to collaborate on marketing and cross-promotion. Other Ultra Worldwide festivals and events take place across the world in locations like Cape Town & Johannesburg, South Africa; Seoul, Korea; Singapore, Singapore; Tokyo, Japan; Hvar and Split, Croatia; Mexico City, Mexico; Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Bogotá, Colombia; and many other destinations. At the end of Ultra Music Festival 2017, it added two more countries: India and Australia. The twentieth edition of Ultra Music Festival will be taking place March 23–25, 2018.

YearAttendanceLocation
1999 - 200010,000South Beach, Miami Beach
200121,000Bayfront Park, Downtown Miami
200221,500
200325,000
200435,000
200548,000
200640,000+Museum Park, Downtown Miami
200750,000
200870,000
200985,000
201093,000
2011100,000
2012165,000Bayfront Park, Downtown Miami
*2013330,000
2014165,000
2015165,000
2016165,000
2017165,000
Attendance figures depict total attendance over the length of the festival.

*2013 Attendance reflects the festival's 15th Anniversary in which Ultra Music Festival was held over two weekends rather than one.

In 2008, Ultra began Ultra Worldwide — starting with Ultra Brasil, which took place in São Paulo, Brasil, now moving to Rio de Janeiro in 2016. Since then, Ultra has debuted worldwide festivals in Buenos Aires, Argentina ; Santiago, Chile (Ultra Chile); Seoul, Korea (Ultra Korea); Johannesburg and Cape Town, South Africa (Ultra South Africa); Tokyo, Japan (Ultra Japan); Bali, Indonesia (Ultra Bali); Singapore, Singapore (Ultra Singapore); and Ibiza, Spain (Ultra Ibiza). In July 2013, Ultra Worldwide debuted Ultra Europe, also known as Destination Ultra, which takes place across the span of a week throughout different venues across Croatia.

2012 began the event concept entitled Road to Ultra, which are single-day, single-stage events. Road to Ultra events have taken place in Thailand, Korea, Japan, Taiwan, Colombia, Paraguay, Puerto Rico, Macau, Chile, Bolivia, and Peru. In 2016, Road to Ultra took place in Hong Kong for the first time, at the West Kowloon Cultural District.

During the 2017 edition of Ultra Miami, it was announced that India and Australia will host Road to Ultra events starting in 2017. In India, Road to Ultra: India will take place in New Delhi during September 2017 and Mumbai during February 2018. As for Australia, the Road to Ultra: Australia will take place at Melbourne in February 2018. Also included in the announcement is the debut of Ultra China, a two-day festival taking place at Shanghai, China on September 9–10, 2018. In late May, it was announced that Ultra Mexico would take place in Mexico City at the Foro Pegaso on October 6–7, 2018.

Ultra Music Festival attracts thousands of visitors from all over the world. Most visitors stay at hotels within the neighborhoods of Downtown Miami or Brickell. This is the most convenient option for attending the festival. Other popular neighborhoods include the Omni and Edgewater, which are both convenient options as well, they are also walking distance from Bayfront Park. Some visitors get hotel accommodations in South Beach. However, reaching South Beach from Ultra Music Festival can be problematic due to traffic, congestion, and expensive transportation options, making it a less popular option. Metrobus routes S, C and 120 connect Ultra directly to South Beach.

Festival attendees are encouraged not to drive to the festival, as parking is scarce and can be very costly. Instead, most visitors take the Miami Metrorail or Metrobus. The nearest Metrorail station is Government Center. Additionally, the free Metromover provides transportation throughout Downtown Miami and Brickell. As of 2016, train and bus service has been extended until 2:00 AM during the weekend of Ultra Music Festival.

Wrap

A wrap is made with a soft flatbread rolled around a filling.

The usual flatbreads are wheat tortillas, lavash, or pita; the filling usually consists of cold sliced meat, poultry, or fish accompanied by shredded lettuce, diced tomato or pico de gallo, guacamole, sauteed mushrooms, bacon, grilled onions, cheese, and a sauce, such as ranch or honey mustard.

Mexicans, Armenians, Middle Easterners, Greeks and Turks have been eating wraps since before the 1900s. Mexicans refer to them as burritos, and they come in different ingredient varieties, primarily wheat flour or corn.

The wrap in its Western form probably comes from California, as a generalization of the Tex-Mex burrito, and became popular in the 1990s. It may have been invented and named at a southern California chain called "I Love Juicy" in the early 1980s. The OVO Bistro in NYC introduced its wrap sandwich in 1990 under the name "The King Edward," The Bobby Valentine Sports Gallery Cafe in Stamford, Connecticut is sometimes claimed to have invented the wrap at about the same time, but Valentine is diffident about it: "Well, that's legend and folklore, but until somebody disputes me or comes up with a better story, I'll say I invented the wrap." Beth Dolan of Stamford, Connecticut is the waitress credited for serving the first wrap after the restaurant had run out of bread. Moreover, Valentine's own story dates his use of the name 'wrap' to the mid-1990s, after it is documented in California.

A wrap is a variation of a sandwich: a sandwich has two distinct layers which are the top and bottom pieces of bread. A wrap, on the other hand, is one piece that completely surrounds the content of the wrap.

Restaurants such as Camille's Sidewalk Cafe, Sonic Drive-In, Jason's Deli, Buffalo Wild Wings, Subway, Chick-fil-A, Roly Poly and McAlister's Deli serve wraps. KFC now serves its chicken in a wrap as menu choice, with lettuce, mayonnaise and salsa. McDonald's has a snack wrap, with a fried, or grilled chicken strip, lettuce, Cheddar, and ranch dressing. Smokey Bones Barbeque and Grill has recently introduced a Portobello Chicken Wrap to broaden their selection of grilled menu items. Wraps are also very popular in Australia and New Zealand with chains such as Oporto and Burger Fuel amongst others serving them.

The UK wrap market has grown substantially since 2004 with all major sandwich and fast food stores now selling wraps.

Downtown Miami Historic District

The Downtown Miami Historic District is a U.S. historic district located in the CBD of Downtown Miami, Florida. The district is bounded by Miami Court, North Third Street, West Third Avenue, and South Second Street. It contains 60 historic buildings. A large portion the buildings in the historic district were built during the Florida land boom of the 1920s, when Miami experienced rapid population growth. Many of the older structures from before the 1920s, were smaller scale buildings and homes from the Miami pioneer era of the mid and late-19th century. Palm Cottage, built in 1897 is a home from the pioneer era that is still standing, however, few of these original homes remain.

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